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in europe are trading lower as ben bernanke warns monetary policy may not be enough to offset the damage if the u.s. economy goes over the fiscal cliff. >>> and the fed takes the new and surprising step in its ongoing efforts to boost the economy, tying interest rates directly to the u.s. unemployment rate. >>> plus, investors cheering the plan to save danone's plans to offset losses over the next two years. >> announcer: you're watching "worldwide exchange," bringing you business news from around the globe. >>> welcome to the program. coming up on today's show, we'll be plenty busy. we head out to tokyo where carry enjoji has been talking about the upcoming elections. then, we hone in on central london where one pilot project is living roof and major buildings. find out what green living can do go r to improve the area. >>> and today, the 1 billionth international tourist will reportedly arrive at a destination in the world. at 11:20 central time, we'll speak to the world travel council to find out why france is still the world's top destination but more money is spent in the u.s. and c
's take a look at how markets are trading. stoxx europe 600 is down about .6% this morning, this after word that house speaker john boehner's plan b didn't come to a vote last night. he couldn't get them in place apparently. we'll have plenty more on the impact of that on the program. not much here, we see decliners well outpacing advancers. the ftse mib in italy down .6%. the ibex down .4%. the dax selling off .5% lower than yesterday. same goes for the ft. if it is, down .8%. 5909. how quickly we've gone from talking about 6,000 to talking about 5,900. the german bund rallying. same goes for the uk. we're seeing a rotation into safety, out of risk and out of spain and italy. about 4.5% for italy. thin trading in markets is exacerbating the move that we're seeing as we approach the year. today, the austy dollar is weaker against the u.s. dollar by about .4%. proxy there for global growth prospects. the dollar/yen is weaker by about .25%. this as markets digest the news out of the boj and gauge whether they'll be successful in boosting inflation ultimately. the euro/dollar, 1.3221. so
20 years. so look, and a lot of this is down to problems, i guess, in europe, right? what is the outlook with what happens with global growth and what is happening? >> unsurprisingly, the volume of growth of trade are strongly correlated to the volume of growth. so growth slows down. trade slows down with a sort of multiple. that's the main reason. there may be other marginal reasons like, for instance, difficulties in trade finance. which is a sort of the aftermath of the financial crisis. but the reality is that the main export market of the senate, which is europe, is not doing well. the second export market is not doing that well. not to talk about japan. so this has a slowdown effect which reverb rates on the growth of emerging countries. >> and i know when you see what's happening in italy, will this, the political developments in italy that cause more instability and less reform there, are you concerned that will have a further destabilization impact? >> no. i mean, i think it comes at a time where we are starting to see an exit, a crisis exist by europe. whether th
, but a change. you were bullish in the u.s. saying i'm going to europe and other areas. why? >> well, maybe it's controversial when you look at the headlines in europe and asia and elsewhere in the world, but our thesis is predicated primarily on what we call price matters, which is essentially evaluations so when you look at the u.s. markets, and in our opinion, u.s. markets are still relatively attractively valued because they are, on our models, 20% below long term return trend sot force of reversion works in your favor, but if you look at efa, it's further below the long term trend, 35%-40% below the long term trend, and history coral lates to strong adjusted returns over the next decade. you know, that's the long term view op places like europe and asia. the shorter term view is that our tool set for tactical moves is don't fight the fed or the trend, be aware of the crowded extremes, and like in the u.s. where the fed is on a risk market side, that's true in the ecb, a huge change. the change in the ecb leadership and the embracing of american style qe is a big reason why we went from st
on the fiscal cliff. equities falling on wednesday in the u.s. on thursday when we opened here in europe, yesterday we saw a relatively stable markets. we closed out on a flat to slightly higher note for most of our european markets yesterday. this morning coming into trade, we're pretty flat. we've taken a bit of a dropdown on this drop but we're just a couple of points lower. in the asian session overnight, we managed to see gains back again. they lost again on the notion of the fiscal cliff not happening. shanghai composite higher by just over 1% in today's session. hang seng, and the kospi closing slightly higher across the board. the european markets mixed, but the ftse 100 still flat to higher. we're all looking towards these fiscal cliff negotiations. at the moment, we've got a couple more days of trade before we get to the end of the new year, as well. most analysts out there, they've been saying we're going to see a relatively flattish end to the year from where we are now given that we've seen such an increase of equities in the past 12 months. we've seen stellar outperformance
for the economy. and the transaction tax is being taken very seriously in europe and probably will happen there, even though the u.k. is kicking and screaming because they specialize in being the home of trading, whether trading in stocks or derivatives or anything else. they simply do not want that to be taxed. there are people in congress. i think wall street is now the number-one contributor to political campaigns. at least, it is in the running for number-one. i have been to washington many times and i'm involved with several groups that are trying to reform the business sector so that it can work, so that it can survive. it is very difficult because of the sheer amount of money that the finance sector in particular is pouring into lobbying and campaign contributions. it is very difficult. >> let's give a round of applause for lin. -- lynn. [applause] there is an opportunity for you to purchase and have the but signed. if you have court-further questions, she will be here signing books. thank you all and have a safe trip home. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [caption
that they're seeing in europe enough to keep them above the pencil line. >> what we've seen so far with today's numbers is exports are declining very sharp. they'll need asia and the u.s. to offset some of that demand weakness, but again, the biggest market for most is the euro zone. if the eurozone is performing badly, that will have a thok-on effect for those countries. >> there's a number of strategists saying after the u.s. has sort of led equities for most of the year, they're now saying europe is the place to be. from i think really the question you have to ask yourself is when cash, equities, credit, government bonds, where do you want to be. and equity in my mind mind is absolutely not. you need good growth numbers to justify the equity markets going up. now, i think there's a lot of investors looking at the yields on ghoechlt bonds or credits and that's motivating them to move into equity. i think the numbers are actually going to be relatively small. and i would certainly advocate against doing that because as you were saying, weak numbers, unless you see some much strong
previously thought, although the session still looks very much on course for another quarter here for europe. the pmi will rise above 50 that divides growth between contraction. hasn't stopped the euro/dollar from hitting a one and a half month high. i suppose we know growth is going to be anemic, but if spanish banks are getting some money, are we feeling slightly better? >> that's what euro trades on, isn't it? pmis are all very interesting for the economist. but they want bigger stories. most of the news flow, it's helpful to the euro. people have been trying to affect this rally for a while. we are close to those october highs. the news flow has been good, i would say. >> we hit, what, nearly 131.80? >> before that, we go 131.40. the enthusiasm for euro is surprisingly good. we're surprised by how far this rally has gone on pretty thin news sometimes. >> i just want to recap what we've got. eurozone finance ministers meeting in brussels. an agreement still seems pretty elusive at this moment. germany and french finance ministers have very different views about oversight of banks. and in
next month. tech stocks fall in europe after ericsson unveils a swedish crown writout related to its loss chip venture. >>> reports say the intercontinental call is in talks to buy euro next. >>> and vows to continue the current government's battle against japanese territorial claims. >>> japan's central bank has decided to extend its asset purchase program to $120 billion. it will review the bank's stance on price stability next month. abe has been putting pressure on the boj to raise its inflation target to 2% as part of efforts to fight deflation. for more on the fallout or the impact here, let's talk to luca from asia pacific. you look like you're in mourning here, but it sounds like the bank of japan has delivered pretty much what the market was looking for the. >> yes. it was delivered in order to be seen as losing independence after the campaign, very aggressive campaign from the ldp party on the bank of japan independence. actually, what -- the only policy they didn't really try, according to ldp, was being extremely aggressive, not as -- or much more aggressive than what the
. the intermediate nuclear forces treaty, or inf, led to the destruction of thousands of europe-based nuclear missiles on both sides. speakers here will include former assistant secretary of state richard burt, former u.s. ambassador to the soviet union, jack matlock, and will also there from former assistant secretary of state rozanne ridgway. the american foreign service association posted this hour and 20 minute event. >> i would like to wish all other good morning. one. i'm susan johnson, the president and i would like to extend a very warm welcome to you all. and thank you for coming to this important and special panel discussion. and also celebration of the 25th anniversary of the signing of the historic treaty. special thanks of course go to our panelists and our moderator, ambassadors matlock, ridgeway and bert, for sharing their experiences and reflections surrounded the complex negotiations that led to this treaty which was a significant factor in reducing dangers of the cold war. i'm sure you know all of these three imminent folks but i would just like to say a quick word. about th
, more green than red on the board today. by three to two, gainers outpacing losers. now, europe was closed yesterday. there was trading in the u.s. it was a weaker session. that move did extend to some parts of asia overnight. interestingly enough, the shanghai composite down .6%. the hang seng was higher on the day. the nikkei adding .9%. the kospi was up even though south korea growth projections were lowered. european markets as we look across the major bourses give you a sense of the action we're seeing in the xetra dax which is about to have its best year in seven years, something like that. the ibex 35 is rallying as we get a further sense of how little value bon can i a has. the ftse mib is moving higher, too, adding about .1%. take a quick look at the bond space, the yield for spain and italy is moving higher today. but roughly as relevance we've seen predominating over the last couple of weeks. that is around 5.3% for spain. 4.5% for italy. we did see guilds moving about 3% level. now back below 1.9%. stick around because straight ahead, we get a view from one economist
reflect a positive outlook. some encouraging news on europe's economic crisis: standard and poor's gave greece a better grade. it got upgraded to a "b-minus" from "selective default" thanks to reassurances that greece will stay in the eurozone. on wall street, the dow rose 115 points, the nasdaq gained almost 44, and the s&p added 16. our next guest says any reasonable fiscal cliff deal is better than no deal. he's robert doll, chief equity strategist and senior portfolio manager at nuveen asset management. >> susie: hi, bob. nice to see you again. >> thanks, susie. >> susie: so investors and traders really do seem to think that a deal is coming, like our previous guest, roger altman. is this rally all about hopes for a deal or something nore fundamental? >> it is about hope for a deal. the malaise and the lack of confidence and the uncertainty has been pervasive, as you well know, susie. that has held corporations back from doing things, from spending money, and some individuals as well. as roger said a few minutes ago, if we can clear the air with some sort of fiscal cliff deal, i thi
in yesterday's rally. we didn't get housing starts, that's earlier today. as for the picture in europe, really the stand outout here is the euro. greece getting a five notch upgrade at the s&p. our road map this morning starts with gm. government motors no more. the treasury to exit its stake in the next 12 to 18 months, purchasing 2 million shares by the end of this month. >> another challenging quarter for fedex with the blame squarely on sandy. but the stock is up pre-market. >> oracle posts a strong quarter with even stronger guidance. the season rebound in europe. no impact from the fiscal cliff. >> and ge gets boosted from ubs's key call list on the weaker than expected macro environment. still on the list is including -- well tell you in a couple of minutes. >> general motors is up sharply in the pre-market session. the treasury department says it intends to sell the rest of its stakes in gm in the next 12 to 15 months. the automaker will buy back 200 million shares from treasury for $27.50 a share. treasury says it plans to sell its other remaining shares through various means in an or
a soft landing. then what about europe? i've seen some people touting europe. if you look at the financial fear indicators in europe, that crisis is basically over. >> well, yes, it is. i don't know if you can capture in the frame on the camera. what i'm doing here, i'm patting myself on the back. who is it who's been telling your viewers for two years every time there's one of these trumped-up crises in europe to buy it. now there's been a solution. europe has been stabilized. it's actually the brightest place for investors on the planet. i'm sorry you missed the bottom but it's not too late. you look at after hearing that segment on the u.s. government making the decision to debase paper coins by turning them into -- paper money by turning them into junk disposable paper coins? well what would you rather own? the ten-year american bond, treasury bond yielding what, 1.6%? or would you rather have a spanish bond denominated in the strongest currency in the world, the euro, paying 5.5%? i'll take spain over the united states at this point any day. >> all right. >> so don't
hikes, europe's grand experiment with taxing the rich more is falling apart, especially in france and britain. and here at home, california and new york are passing through the 50% tax rate barrier. is anybody looking at how tax hikes fail the test of economic growth? >>> back here in the u.s., could it be michigan which used to call itself the worker's paradise union state is now moving towards new anti-union right-to-work legislation and it looks like it's going to pass? but first up, budget talks resume between speaker john boehner and president obama today. with just 25 days to go, let's keep tabs on where we stand. reports of a conservative backlash against speaker boehner simply not true. he has the solid support of his leadership and the rank and file. but there is concern among some in the gop that they are at risk of becoming the party for rich people while president obama and democrats stake their claim on the middle class. and my tax rate flexibility with higher -- here's what the president said earlier today. >> i'm not going to sign any package that somehow prevent pr
slowly than they would like to, if at all. europe is basically flat, the u.s. is improving, but it is not exactly galloping and, you know, we are entering probably a weak quarter where people are hoping it will be stronger over the course of the year, china is slowing some and in general all of the emerging markets are slower than they were most of them india has slowed dramatically, brazil is slow, so yes, indeed it is a fragile situation, when the u.s. is one of the bright spots, you know, eking out make two percent growth, one percent growth this quarter you know things aren't very good. >> rose: do you expect to see, speaking of the united states, growth rate getting back close to four percent? >> well, you know, it is in the realm of possibility, but i think the trend growth rate, you know, is going to be more on the order of two and a half and i mean some days some quarters it will be worse than that, some quarters it will be better than that. there are many private forecasters calling for it to be three percent by years end, i think we are doing pretty well if that h
there of in europe. mario monti is stepping down as prime minister of italy. he lost support of the people. he was out in front of italy's debt crisis last year and he lowered the bar in cost. he is a smart guy. he obviously does not want to stay there. investors took heart from the latest data out of china. growth is accelerating. no more that owning our process here. almost 10%. beating analyst estimates. copper moved higher. it is an industrial metal. money flowing into stocks. minors like numa mining. then, of course, the announcement that they would be taking a big acquisition. today, it is up more than a percent. cliff natural of about 5%. we should not forget mcdonald's. better same-store sales than expected. coming up in just a few minutes. cash is king at ethan allen peered the furniture retailer throwing a lot more cash at shareholders. they are announcing a one-time payout this month alone. we will get the inside story from ethan allen chairman and ceo farooq kathwari. you have to hear about his plans for china. international expansion is a huge priority. the chinese may like that p
're cleaner than europe is right now. >> right. >> so we haven't felt it. my main worry is the following, that if the republicans and democrats can't get together to solve the fiscal cliff you will need an external force, a major market sell-off, you will need a major economic trauma to get them to poex. >> other things have been on the table. i want to talk to our viewers about a few of those as soon as we come back. coming up next, republicans want a new formula for inflation. it's called chained cpi. not a bad idea overall but it could slow the payments to social security recipients. the president has said he could agree to it but democrat lawmakers say no way. [ male announcer ] it's simple physics... a body at rest tends to stay at rest... while a body in motion tends to stay in motion. staying active can actually ease arthritis symptoms. but if you have arthritis, staying active can be difficult. prescription celebrex can help relieve arthritis pain so your body can stay in motion. because just one 200mg celebrex a day can provide 24 hour relief for many with arthritis pain and inf
morning. all right. coming up new at 10, germany's chancellor angela merkel says europe will have to work very hard to it maintain its current standard of living. at the top of the hour, find out what she's saying about welfare and here is another development from overseas. we brought you the story last week, french actor gerard depardu, he is leaving home, leaving france because of higher taxes and handed in his passport. now, the french prime minister has some choice words for mr. depardu. he's obviously in the happy with him and find out exactly what he said at ten o'clock eastern time this morning. time is money. 30 seconds, here is what else we've got for you, an in japan, again, a landslide win, so, what's the new prime minister going to do about the world's worst debt problem? print more money and stimulate more, too. build more infrastructure. will that work? we have our own resident japan expert. question, is jeff immelt's cozy relationship with the president costing general electric shareholders money? we will be discussing it. and i lost on friday when i questioned "the washing
states, 7% china, 5% india, negative one in europe. in that environment you want to own a portfolio of multinational companies with dividends, global exposure, it will provide as good of a return as anything else when you have bonds and cash paying so low. as long as you understand you're in the seven, 8% environment, portfolio stocks should be part of that. david: let's talk to a guy that says full speed ahead torpedoes. he thinks it will be better than this year was. saying people are confusing pickups for heart attacks in today's market to all these problems are going to seem like nothing when we come to the big gains of next year. you really think that will bear out, and how do you invest with that kinddof optimistic strategy? >> first of all what we have seen with investor sentiment is contradictory to what we've seen with consumer sentiment and business sentiment. when you see negative investor sentiment is not just in the retail side but also the institutional side creating a great potential opportunity for performance. secondly if you take a look at kicking the can down the
. >>> and corporate news weighs on sentiment across europe. kpn shares fall after dividend and greco stocks plunges as analysts cut their outlook for the uk power group. >> okay. welcome. it's the start of a brand new week here on "worldwide exchange." and don't adjust your set, kelly and i are together. >> for once, for a day. >> but make the most of it because it won't be lasting. >> if only there were a slo-mo. >> i'm going to enjoy as much as i can of today. >> and likewise. and then we're going to have to get all of our u.s. voouers to find cnbc world because they could get three hours of you, carol and carolin for the rest of the week. >> whatever they can do. record it and fast forward to the good bits. >> yeah. >> it will be 2:00, 3:00 in the morning or whatever. >>> on today's show, plenty to come on. >> yes. the south american union faces ejection from the imf for allegedly cooking its books about the innation rate. we'll head out to europe where the swiss banking giants could be facing $1.6 billion over libor rate rigging allegations. >> and we'll be on the floor in beijing where china's
normally on boosting growth. >>> well, it's been a rel ofly good year for stocks in europe. adding about .3%. advancers mostly outpacing decliners on the index this morning. if we can zero in on the bourses, it's largely green behind me. the fits fits mib is atting .6%. the ibex in spain, up 0.8%. and the ftse up about 0.3%. now, some company-specific news this morning, fin mechanica saying shares up 2.4%. this on news they're set to buy sge-avio. safran is also a company considering that change. let's take a quick look at the bond space. we'll get a sense of the kind of trade we're seeing shaping up. it is consistent with flows into the periphery, perhaps out of the core and the risk on move generally that we're seeing this morning. yields up to 4.5 roughly in italy at about 5.4%, respectively. gilt is moving up towards is.9% this morning. the bund yield is still extremely low, so that spread between gilt and bund is widening. look at the euro/dollar. 1 1.3171. extraordinary. we're almost up at that 1.32 level. the dollar/yen is flat, right about 83.88. there we go. a little bit of movemen
, but we are cleaner than europe is right now. so we haven't felt it. my main worry is the following. if the republicans and the democrats can't get together to solve the fiscal cliff, then you will need an external force, you will need major market selloff. you will need a major economic trauma to get them to focus. >> there are other things that have been on the table. i want to talk about a few of those, as soon as we come back. coming up, the republicans want a new formula for inflation, it's called chained cpi, it could slow the growth in payments to social security recipients, that's got some people mad. the president has said he could agree do it, but democratic lawmakers say no way. [ bells dinging ] ♪ hark how the bells, sweet silver bells ♪ ♪ all seem to say throw care away ♪ ♪ from everywhere, filling the air ♪ [ female announcer ] chex party mix. easy 15-minute homemade recipes you just pop in a microwave. like caramel chocolate drizzles. happier holidays. chex party mix. happier holidays. santho, ho, ho!anta! santa! want to see some magic? watch this! merry c
deal or not. futures are up and the dow gained 100 yesterday. but there is room for skepticism. europe's grappling with the same question helped by some decent uk inflation data today. and a t-bill auction in spain. our road map begins with what appear to be significant progress in the debt negotiations overnight. a whose proposal looking to raise rates for those making more than $400,000 a year. but senator corker on squawk just poured a bucket of ice water on those hopes. >> whitney boosts her recommendations on citi, bank of america and discover financial. is that move by one of the more famous financial bears, a sign of a new era for banks? >> walmart is once again the target of a "new york times" investigation. but does the paper add anything new and can the stock outperform just as it did last time. >> private equity firm server said it will sell the firearms conglomerate. is private equity talking about guns in the country. >> futures moving higher on optimism. the white house republicans rising above partisanship, getting closer to striking a deal on the fiscal cliff. we have t
data showing the private sector has expanded for the first time since april and signaling europe could avoid a recession in q4. >>> and japan's business sentiment sours in the fourth quarter. this reading comes two days before a nationwide vote that suggests it will hand the ldp position a landslide win. >>> we're going to give you all the latest results from the flash december data for the pmi for the eurozone that we're just getting out. the overall, the deposit is a touch stronger for the month of december. the details show the manufacturing weakened slightly and its services strengthened slightly. they are overall still in negative territory. and we're seeing the euro/dollar respond a little bit to the downside. down about 0.01% trying to fight back into flat on the day. 130.75 is the level there. again, the services pmi is at 47.8. compared with the 47 that was expected. it's a five-month high. the manufacturing pmi, 46.1. the manufacturing all told, 46.3. that's a bit under the poll of 46.6. with more on the reaction to these figures, we have rob doddson with us. rob, welcome. it
china and europe and japan are having major problems of their own. that could affect the way they do business with us. joining us is to talk about, ed, good to see you. biggest problem some of these governments to stimulate their economies, die let's just print a bunch of money. that has catastrophic events with them and even with the united states that may tried traded with them. >> that seems to be just to print money. that is not how it works. when somebody prints money, it's devalues their currency which makes anything they want to export or anything that they are importing more expensive. that is why your food is more expensive because we imported a lot of that. that is why energy is more expensive because we import a lot of that. if every country is doing that, its race to the bottom how quickly they can devalue their currency. >> we trade with so many different nations. we trade with europe and certainly with china. look at our trade imbalance and you can figure that out. europe has only a handful of countries that are doing decently? >> there is about six. they are in the nor
of liters of maple syrup they are missing. europe khas weather is looking unsettled at the moment. we -- europe's weather is looking unsettled at the moment. torrential rain, leaving more than 100 flood warnings in force, and yet more weather systems moving in from the west. flooding issues here leading up to christmas. elsewhere, we are seeing some significant snowfall over the last day or so, causing problems across much of the country. we are expecting improvement here. the snow tending to move away. ukraine seeing heavy snow, desperately cold weather here in. as for the west, we are seeing that rain pushed in across the uk, down into much of france. flooding is likely. it should be fine across much of the iberian peninsula, 15 degrees expected in madrid. further east, this extends through north africa, so for both tripoli and benghazi, it will be cloudy, the chance of some showers. 19 degrees in cairo as a maximum. along the coast, for the west, whitely dryer -- likely dryer. solutions for america, friday, 7:00 p.m. eastern, 4:00 p.m. pacific. >> hello again. top stories on al jaz
talked about that ubs story. that's a massive, massive fine. one of the biggest banks here in europe. yes, there have been a lot of press speculation about the side of the fine, but it's three times bigger than the fine ba barclay's was fined. ubs also admitting to criminal wro wrongdoing in japan. >> how are global markets doing at this hour? >> well, actually global markets are up. they're cheering, you know, the fact that there could be a fiscal cliff deal between democrats and republicans. look, we've got european markets close to year highs, the cac and dax at 52-week highs. this is more related to the expected aggressive monetary easing by the boj, but even the u.s. markets, the s&p 500 at a two-month high. >> i'm curious, we never really know how the fiscal cliff conversation plays out overseas. is it something that moves the needle in the markets in europe and asia? >> absolutely it does. given that, you know, in terms of european risk, everything pretty much done and dusted. we don't have much more european event risk until the end of the year, this is what we're focusing on. eve
. the dollar has been lower. they have talked about the gains that we have been seeing over in europe. the euro top 50. that is very interesting, as well. this is the environment. it bodes very well. another winning day here on wall street. drug stocks, bank stocks doing well. the vix, the fear index, is to the downside. let's take a look at urban outfitters. taking a look at their quarterly sales. they are looking better than expected. under their umbrella is a name brand that a lot of the teenagers know very well. they had a good block friday. urban outfitters is up over two dollars. back to you. connell: as we get close to this fiscal cliff, both sides agreeing to get serious. we have heard the house speaker will update us on the talks within that hour from house floor. we will hear what speaker banner has to say. joining us right now are to congressman. would you vote if there was an agreement? >> i think it will be a balanced plan that will increase revenues by raising the rates on upper income families, but, at the same time, agreeing to substantial cuts. connell: the reason i started by
losing month in nine years for mcdonald's, but they're doing well for breakfast and in europe. lori: thank you as always. melissa: president obama had to try to seeking more support for the fiscal cliff plan. peter barnes is here with the latest. >> just over an hour they will speak at a diesel engine plant persoextending tax cuts for fedl tax workers. keeping up the pressure on republicans to cave on taxes after the president and speaker john boehner met at the white house yesterday in a spokesperson said discussions with the white house are taking place, but we have no details to share about the substance of those conversations. they say perhaps the best strategy for them is to accept some higher tax rate the president is demanding, get that off the table and combat entitlement reform early next year the president can work for increasing the debt ceiling. republicans will have a little bit more leverage. speak a lot of people putting forward a theory, and i think it has merit for you give the president to 2% increass he is talking about, the rate increase on the top 2%, so there i
at what's been happening in europe, you'll see a similar story there. actually a little stronger gains. in france, the cac up by about two-thirds of 1%. in germany, the dax up by 0.4% and ftse in london is up by a quarter percent. in asia overnight, you did see the hang seng down by about 1.2%. shanghai composite down, as well, down by 1%. in consider rea, the kospi up by 0.6%. oil prices have been a little weaker. down by about seven crept cents. and ten year note yielding 1.61%. that's been stuck in a tight range for quite a while. take a look at the dollar this morning. you'll see the euro at this point is still above 1.30, 1.3029 even though the dollar down across the board. dollar-yen at 82.10. gold prices this morning are up by about $8. as the fiscal cliff approaches, we're wondering what we can expect from the markets. our guest hosts again barry knapp and richard bernstein. barry, you're concerned about the direction the talks have taken. >> yeah, it's interesting as i actually traveled through europe last week, there is all this focus on the timing of getting a deal. but ther
and nuclear weapons. it will result in weapons ownership. look at europe. look at japan. look at the rest of the world. we are way, way out there. we have the highest murder rate in the world. it hasn't protected us. it has resulted in arguments that should have a consequence of maybe a slap in the face, resulting in a bullet through the heart. it results in a double-murder in this case, a murder/suicide. guns don't protect. they cause suicide. >> let me bring in -- >> they cause suicide? >> i can promise, i'll get back to you, carol. here is what they say to me. i've had it all. but trying to get a debate going. i've been on two years on cnn. in that time, there's been a series of gun rages. each time it is the same debate and nothing gets done about it. 300 million guns and you have between 11,000 and 12,000 guns and murders a year. by comparison, britain has 35 as does germany and australia. japan has one or two. to countries that have strict gun control have very little gun murder. what do you say to americans who say it makes me feel safe? >> i think carole had it right. she said it
a sense of europe. they have got to find a way to work out all of their differences to save the euro. i believe they will. you can see it and feel it. they will find a way. they will muddle through, but they will find a way to get it done. these countries are also looking to us. test included a discarding of the old nation of communique's on issues about which we disagreed and patched over with language that was always misinterpreted and establishment of the arms control, human rights and -- human rights, arms control, regional issues and bi-la salle rail -- bilateral issues. it meant we didn't trade one interest for another. it was interesting how quickly people would say if the soviet union does something we don't like let's make them pay with a u.s. interest. as we got away with that with the new negotiating approach and made our way to geneva, we arrived with some sense of things being very different in the soviet union. one of the preparatory trips we had met with the one member who said, you know, as new leaders when we got to be in charge the cupboard was bare. i'm not sure a lot
europe slip into the mediterranean. and so also given other asset classes equities appear to be relatively attractive. >> let's talk about that, actually. because did you ask the people that you survey what are the best asset csse and stks got-- was at the top of the list. let's look at the list here, followed by precious metals, commodities, bonds and cash at the bottom of the list. tell us a little bit pore about those rankings from investment managers? >> sure. and these are charter financial analysts that we survey, our members. they spend their time in the markets investing. and compared to last year, there is more pessimism about the prospect it's for bonds, for fixed income given the very low nominal level of yields. and also for cash where basically you cat get any return. equies we the clear favorite with over 50% of our respondents saying that they would be the best asset class. >> there is still some pessimism about europe, primarily coming from respondents, our members there. but there's more open coming from-- optimistic from charter financial analysts who are
of uncertainty. so you have china engineering a soft landing and starting to recover. you have europe away from the brink. greece got upgraded today. who would have thought it. that is what the market is looking at. saying okay. it is not going to be the worst kcase sharcenario, but you coul extend the middle class tax cuts and be done with it. it is in a recession. >> and i think the market would not like that very much. everybody is expecting that you get the middle class tax cuts done. >> and if you can get china and europe doing better. it is hard to be terribly bearish on the u.s. >> y are going to stay with our politico expert. this is a rally that has surprised experts. it hasn't been that easy to be optimistic. >> it is. i think you have to be cautious here. the probability that this could fall apart is very, very real. >> so, you have to be careful up at these levels as a trader. i have low exposure up here. i have protection. that is how you have to play this market. stay with us please. >> yesterday it looked like washington was inching towards a deal. but today, plan b could be sign
many issues. for example, we're still trying to figure out europe and the depth and duration of that economy. that's just one of many. clearly i don't need another challenge coming from the uncertainty around the fiscal cliff. >> susie: you do a lot of business in china, and you're very bullish on china. can your business in china offset any during you might have in your business from what goes on in the u. economy? >> probably not. i'm bullish in the auto business and the building trades, but that is not going to be enough to offset the fiscal cliff, and we're going to have to manage europe at the same time. >> susie: let's say there is no deal and the u.s. economy really slows down, or as some people say could go into a recession, how are you preparing for that possibility? >> we're trying to make those investments that are strategic, and holding back on our hiring because we don't know the growth rates. we're probably looking at the different ways to duce our poits from a logical standpoint, and we're trying to pull every lever to give us some latitude and leverage. >> sus
. the european union is britain's largest trading partner, europe's economy remains on prepares you footing despite several months of relative calm and there's a growing debate about whether the u.k. should lead the e.u. earlier this month we covered the "economist" magazine read "good-bye europe, look what happened when britain left the e.u. " i'm pleased to have george osborne back on this program and back at this table. >> thank you very much. >> rose: you're in new york city for a speech at the manhattan institute. >> i did that last night and had some meetings on wall street, seeing them there later. >> rose: so what's your message about the british economy to manhattan institute as well as the mayor and wall street? >> well, the basic message is britain is open for business. if you want to come and invest in a country that is dealing with its problems, cutting its business taxes, providing opportunities for companys to go britain is the place. i think we're doing better. >> rose: you do? >> i certainly do. >> rose: the numbers don't look like that. >> well, actually, look at the u.k.
of the things that has happened since 1989 is the region called eastern europe has become very differentiated. these countries will longer have anything in common with each other except for the common memory of communist occupation. >> more with anne applebaum, tonight at 8:00 on a "q&a." >> "washington journal" continues. host: for the latest in the so- called fiscal cliff negotiations, we are joined by stand from -- stanley collender, and we also have josh gordon. thanks to you as well. stan, you were on last week and we ask you for the percentages. you put the chance of a fiscal cliff getting done at. this week? -- gettguest: i think there is o chance other than new year's day, and even that might be overstating it a little bit. right now i am seeing a 75% chance that they will go over the cliff. host: joshua, what odds would you give? caller: i have no idea. i would say that it could be 50 -- guest: i have no idea. i would say. the thing that americans and the public should worry about is whether they get something done soon. there is a chance that by inauguration day, something will be d
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